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Should the voting age be 16? Show more Show less

Traditionally, the legal age for voting is 18. However, as more and more teenagers become politically active, calls have increased for the voting age to decrease to 16 so that older teenagers can vote. Should 16- and 17-year-olds be allowed to have their voice heard politically? Or are they simply not mature enough?

No, the age requirement should be raised Show more Show less

Teenagers shouldn't be voting.
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The age category of 18-29 has very low turnout

Statistically, young people vote less. Therefore, there is no point allowing them to vote.
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Context

The Argument

According to a study by the US Election Project, the age group of 18-29 had the lowest voter turnout, compared to the highest group of 60+. Similarly in the UK, only one out of every three young adults able to vote are even registered to vote. If young people can't even be bothered to register to vote, why should they have the right to cast their ballot? The voting age should be raised because the higher age categories are much more likely to actually register and vote. Ballots don't need to be wasted.

Counter arguments

Low turnout isn't a reason to change the age requirement. It says something about the society's attitude to young voters. Perhaps education on voting and electoral issues should be implemented before elections occur, rather than completely isolating a group from their individual rights.

Framing

Premises

[P1] The young voting demographic has a low turnout. [P2] Accurate voting requires a high turnout.

Rejecting the premises

[Rejecting P1] The proportion of young people that vote is growing.

Proponents

Further Reading

References

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    This page was last edited on Monday, 30 Mar 2020 at 11:49 UTC