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Does grammar matter? Show more Show less

Grammar can often seem to be an annoyance to be aware of when we write or speak. In comment sections all over the internet we might observe someone making a grammatical mistake such as using “your” instead of “you’re”, and people indignantly pointing out the error. In the end, those who read that comment understand what the writer meant - so does it really matter at all?

Grammar does not matter Show more Show less

Sticking to grammatical rules is a waste of time because it is superfluous.
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Only the basic knowledge of grammar is needed for successful communication

Learning the rules of grammar does not make someone more fluent at a language.
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Context

The Argument

You do not need to be proficient at the grammar of a language to read and write it fluently. For example, the difference between a sentence, phrase and clause is almost inconsequential; at the essence, those three terms all mean “a group of words”, despite having technical differences when discussing grammar. Most people can get by with just the basic knowledge of sentence construction, or even with just the combination of a few words and body language.

Counter arguments

Basic sentences and body language does not make for efficient or thorough communication. Many details might not be expressed and thus affect the effectiveness of communication. With grammatical knowledge, more complex sentences can be formed and in spite of little errors, the general meaning can be conveyed more adequately. There’s a difference between bad grammar in a text message or an online forum as compared to a formal publication like a white paper or news article. I can accept your spelling and grammar issues when you punch out a quick response with your thumbs. When I’m trying to learn something, I expect the author’s position to be clear and easy to parse.

Framing

Premises

[P1] People can communicate with basic sentences and body language.

Rejecting the premises

Proponents

Further Reading

References

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    This page was last edited on Saturday, 9 May 2020 at 13:30 UTC