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Should there be a united Ireland? Show more Show less

The status of Northern Ireland has been the subject of intense debate and decades of violence, known as the Troubles. Though Northern Ireland is now at peace, the question of whether it should remain in the United Kingdom or join the Republic of Ireland remains a source of contention. Should there be a united Ireland?

Yes, Ireland should be united Show more Show less

All 32 counties of Ireland should be united into a single nation with no land border
(1 of 4 Positions) Next >

Britain doesn't care about Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland should not be part of a c country that resents its existence as Britain does
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Context

The Argument

After a poll conducted by YouGov in March of 2020 found that 54 percent of British citizens would not be bothered if Northern Ireland left the United Kingdom, Britain's overall disinterest in the future of the region was confirmed. Exposing this weak link between Northern Ireland and the United Kingdom, this recent survey also reported a 41 percent increase from when they conducted the same study in October 2019. This sentiment is believed to have originated from the lack of Irish history taught in school. As a result, many British citizens claim to feel distant from Ireland as opposed to other regions in the United Kingdom like that of Scotland and Wales. [1] An additional belief that Northern Ireland is a risk to peace and a financial burden to the rest of the United Kingdom remains at the forefront of this argument. Specifically, in looking at HM Treasury figures from 2016-2017, it is made clear that the UK spends more in supporting Northern Ireland than it does to remain in the EU. [2] This attitude is again reflected in numerous other economic areas such as the increasing gap in unemployment between Northern Ireland and the remaining regions in the UK. [3]

Counter arguments

Over the course of the past three years, the UK government has offered up £2.5 billion of financial support and flexibility for the Northern Ireland Executive. The UK government is committed to ensuring the needs of Northern Ireland and this is likewise properly reflected in the future UK shared Prosperity Fund, which will not only benefit Northern Ireland but all parts of the UK.[4] Thus, if Britain truly did not care for Northern Ireland, why would they keep providing financial support to the region? If Britain truly did not care for the future of Northern Ireland, they would have encouraged their independence or reunification with the Republic of Ireland. Instead, Northern Ireland remains supported despite featuring the highest poverty rates in the UK. [5] Therefore, it is clear that Britain does truly care about the destiny of Northern Ireland.

Framing

Premises

[P1] Polls show increasing disinterest by British citizens regarding the future of Northern Ireland. [P2] Worries over short-lived peace and reports of a worsening economic situation in Northern Ireland motivate British belief that they should no longer hold responsibility.

Rejecting the premises

Proponents

Further Reading

References

  1. https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2020/04/22/brits-increasingly-dont-care-whether-northern-irel
  2. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2019/10/10/northern-ireland-burden-rest-uk-cant-let-get-way-brexit/
  3. https://sluggerotoole.com/2018/08/04/paul-gosling-it-costs-more-for-ni-to-be-within-the-uk-than-for-the-uk-to-be-in-eu-feile18/
  4. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/conservative-and-dup-agreement-and-uk-government-financial-support-for-northern-ireland/uk-government-financial-support-for-northern-ireland
  5. https://scopeni.nicva.org/article/northern-ireland-has-the-lowest-poverty-rates-in-the-uk

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This page was last edited on Saturday, 27 Jun 2020 at 21:26 UTC