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How do we think about the George Floyd murder? Show more Show less

On May 25 2020, George Floyd was suffocated to death by the police. Floyd had been arrested on suspicion of using a counterfeit $20 bill. In chilling footage that would go viral within 24 hours, officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for more than 8 minutes ignoring Floyd's repeated pleas for him to move. The asphyxiation led to his cardiac arrest. Floyd's death has so far inspired protests across more than 75 US cities, calling for an end to police brutality and institutional racism. The responses to these riots have included state-wide curfews, the threat of military intervention, attacks on the media and civilian arrests. The situation has given rise to a complex debate with commentators arguing over what precisely it has exposed about contemporary America. So, who are these groups, what do they stand for, and why?

The murder is simply a murder: It is not representative of wider issues Show more Show less

This approach believes that an isolated murder cannot be used to make broader points about America, its society, and politics.
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The George Floyd protests are completely unjustified

The riots are an appalling, disproportionate reaction to an everyday crime. A single murder is no justification for the anarchy that is unfolding on the streets of America. These lawless riots are razing cities to the ground. There is no excuse and they must be stopped: the scale of carnage is completely disproportionate. In many cases, criminals with no interest in the issues being discussed are taking advantage of the situation for personal gain. It has given criminals free license to operate. Proponents include commentator Meghan McCain, Senator Ted Cruz, and the Columbia Bugle Editorial Board.
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    This page was last edited on Wednesday, 3 Jun 2020 at 11:27 UTC