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Should animated films be considered for Best Picture at the Academy Awards? Show more Show less

The Academy Awards is among one of the most prestigious awards ceremonies for film in the world. The most coveted award of the ceremony is that for Best Picture. While animated features, such as Disney's Beauty and the Beast, have been nominated for this award, none have ever won. Further, there is a separate category for the Best Animated Feature that does not consider live-action film. Is there a way to acknowledge both forms of media in a single category without stigmatizing either?

No, animated films should not be considered for Best Picture at the Academy Awards Show more Show less

Animated films are too different to be fairly compared with live action films.
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The majesty of escapism

Films have long been touted as a means to escape reality and become immersed in other worlds and stories.
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Context

The Argument

Escapism is defined as entertainment as an escape from reality or routine.[1] The primary goal of film is to offer the audience a means of escaping the complicated and messy world that they live in. As such, film is a type of escapism.[2] When it comes to types of films, animated films have a huge advantage in providing "an escape from reality." Animation is limited only by imagination, whereas live action film is limited by CGI technology and reality. Thus, comparing animated films to live action films would leave live action films at a disadvantage when it comes to providing the audience with imaginative landscapes and characters. Live action films cannot be fairly compared to animated films for "Best Picture" when the primary goal of a film is escapism.

Counter arguments

While it may be the goal of some films to provide the audience with an escape, it is not the primary goal of all films. Some films aim to make the audience connect with a character first and foremost. While it may be easier for animation to provide escapism, the fact that escapism is not the primary goal of all films minimizes this advantage. Further, if films were judged solely on the effectiveness of their escapism, it is safe to say that at least one of the animated films nominated for Best Picture would have won the award. Since no animated film has ever won the Best Picture category, it can be assumed that escapism is not a significant factor in the selection process for the winner of Best Picture.

Framing

Premises

[P1] The primary goal of movies is to provide the audience with escapism. [P2] The award for Best Picture will usually be awarded to the film that was most successful in producing this escapism. [P3] Animated movies have an unfair advantage and should not be included in this category.

Rejecting the premises

[Rejecting P1] The primary goal of film is not escapism but rather allowing the audience to connect with the characters. [Rejecting P2] A film is awarded Best Picture based on how successful it is at conveying emotion and telling a story, not providing the audience with escapism.

Proponents

Further Reading

References

  1. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/escapism
  2. https://www.inverse.com/article/24000-star-wars-rogue-one-trump-escapism

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This page was last edited on Monday, 27 Apr 2020 at 13:06 UTC