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Is theocracy good? Show more Show less

Theocracy is a form of government in which God or a deity of some type is recognised as the supreme ruling authority, giving divine guidance to human intermediaries that manage the day to day affairs of the government who claim they are in power due to the divine will of their God or gods. Famous theocracies throughout history include the Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece and the Roman Empire where Emperors were often declared gods.

Yes, theocracies have many good points Show more Show less

Almost every major religion has a concept of a theocracy as part of its doctrine.
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Theocracies create a sense of unity within society

A theocracy gives all citizens something to be united over.
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Context

The Argument

In practice, the word means a belief in religious unity as the necessary basis of politics.[1] Famous theocracies throughout history include the Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece and the Roman Empire where Emperors were often declared gods. Almost every major religion has a concept of a theocracy as part of its doctrine. Of the relatively few that exist today, Islamic theocracies often receive the most attention in western culture. These include Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Afghanistan and Iran. Iran has been described as a "theocratic republic," and its constitution has been described as a "hybrid" of "theocratic and democratic elements. However other theocracies also exist. Vatican City is ruled by the Pope (who Catholics believe is a direct descendant of Saint Peter) and Mount Athos in Greece is under the direct jurisdiction the Eastern Orthodox church.[2][3][4] The state of Israel is a theocracy and they believe they are the chosen nation of the Living God. When a government is structured as a theocracy, then the spiritual and physical needs of a society come together under the same governing umbrella. Even though there are different opinions that are accepted under this structure, everyone feels like they are on the same team.[5]

Counter arguments

Framing

Premises

[P1] A theocracy unites its citizens. [P2] Additionally, theocracies allow citizens to carry out what is often part of their religious doctrine.

Rejecting the premises

Proponents

Further Reading

Ferrero M. (2009) The Economics of Theocracy. In: Ferrero M., Wintrobe R. (eds) The Political Economy of Theocracy. Palgrave Macmillan, New York Naser Ghobadzadeh & Lily Zubaidah Rahim (2016) Electoral theocracy and hybrid sovereignty in Iran, Contemporary Politics, 22:4, 450-468, DOI: 10.1080/13569775.2016.1175097

References

  1. https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/why-we-need-to-talk-about-theocracy
  2. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1057/9780230620063_3
  3. https://www.staff.ncl.ac.uk/nick.megoran/pdf/theocracy.pdf
  4. https://www.biola.edu/blogs/good-book-blog/2016/does-the-world-need-a-theocracy
  5. https://connectusfund.org/6-advantages-and-disadvantages-of-theocracy

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This page was last edited on Monday, 30 Mar 2020 at 09:59 UTC