Mapping the world's opinions

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Is there too much money in football?

From humble beginnings, football has exploded into one of the most-watched sports in the world. Far from being just a game, football is now a multi-billion dollar industry. But does compromise the integrity of the game? Would football be better if there was less money involved?

Yes, there's too much money in football

The influence of money has ruined the spirit of football and the game would be better off it could go back to being less focused on money.

Poorer teams can't compete with the richest ones

Money has become a block to success for the vast majority of teams. If you support a team without much money, your only hopes of success are seeing a rich tycoon invest vast sums into your club Explore

Footballers earn millions while billions live in poverty

The world's best footballers make millions of pounds in a single year. This is more money than anyone could need and would be better spent going towards the less-well-off. Explore

Local, working-class football fans are being priced out

Most teams have been built on the back of the support of their local, working class communities and should exist for these fans. However, instead, the modern game has created higher ticket prices that mean these fans can't afford to watch their teams. Explore

Football commercialisation has taken over the game

Corporate logos are everywhere in football, while sponsors often get a large amount of tickets for the biggest matches. Football should not be an advertisement for products. Explore

No, the amount of money in football is fine

While football and money have become more linked, this has not harmed the game, and in fact may even have improved it

Football is a path to riches for the poor

Unlike most paths to economic success, there are very few barriers to entry to succeed in football. There is no reason why someone from a poor family cannot succeed and indeed many of the richest footballers in the world came from these backgrounds. Football, therefore, does more to help the poor than most other avenues. Explore

The money trickles down into communities

The largest football clubs have to spend a portion of their revenue on grassroots funding, while transfer fees also trickle down from larger clubs to smaller ones. This means that the money at the top level of the game eventually reaches local communities where it provides a much-needed resource. Explore

If there was too much money in football, prices would come down

Football, like everything in a free market, is governed by the laws of supply and demand. The prices of player wages, transfer fees, TV rights, tickets and clubs merely reflects the level of global interest in the game. Explore

The money comes from rich owners who can afford it

Much of the increase in money in football is due to cash investments from rich owners such as Roman Abramovich or Sheikh Mansour. If not for football, this money wouldn't go to helping those in need, but to their own private gain, where it may even cause great harm. Explore
This page was last edited on Monday, 30 Mar 2020 at 17:25 UTC