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Should birth control be free? Show more Show less

Birth control has many positive impacts, including pregnancy prevention, protection from STDs, and allowing regulation of the menstrual cycle. However, these products can cost large amounts of money, the onus of payment for which is generally on women. Should these products be free, or should they cost money?

Some forms of birth control should be free Show more Show less

Items like condoms should be free, but others should cost money.
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Condoms are easy to access

Condoms can be carried in almost every kind of store and do not require a prescription, providing ease of access.
< Previous (1 of 1 Argument)

Context

The Argument

By making condoms free, we would be both increasing production in the birth control industry and providing easy access to a simple form of birth control. Condoms are small, simple and easy to use. They can be carried by nearly every basic grocery or drug store supplier, and only cost around a dollar each. It's a win-win. Free condoms are also a much easier debate than free birth control pills, IUDs, or implants. They are not surgical, they are easy to understand, and almost anyone can get them.

Counter arguments

Condoms still cost money to create, and unless stores are being given condoms to give out for free, cost money to place inside stores. We also cannot trust that people would not steal these free condoms and attempt to turn a profit, taking all of them and trying to sell them.

Framing

Premises

[P1] Condoms are easy to access and cheap. [P2] Condoms should be free.

Rejecting the premises

[Rejecting P2] This is not economically sustainable.

Proponents

Further Reading

References

    This page was last edited on Wednesday, 15 Apr 2020 at 12:36 UTC