Mapping the world's opinions

argument top image

What are the solutions to the Israel Palestine conflict? Show more Show less

What started as intercommunal violence between Israelis and Arabs in the 1920s evolved over the course of the twentieth century into a full-blown civil war and open conflict. After much bloodshed and the dawn of a new century, what would a solution to the Israel-Palestine situation look like? Is peace even a possibility for one of the world's longest-running conflicts?

A two-state solution Show more Show less

There must be two separate, independent states, one Israeli and one Palestinian, each with its own government and full autonomy over its domestic and international affairs.
< Previous (2 of 5 Positions) Next >

The most popular outcome

A two-state solution is the most popular outcome for those living in the region.
< Previous (3 of 4 Arguments) Next >

Context

As conflict wages on between Israelis and Palestinians over land rights, multitudes of solutions are presented and many nations are involved. A two-state solution, with Israel and Palestine independent states existing in the same region, has been attempted multiple times, divvying up land for rule by either Palestine or Israel. While this solution has not solved the conflict so far, many still advocate for it as the best option.

The Argument

Though many other nations have become involved in the Israel and Palestine conflict over time, ultimately Israelis and Palestinians are the ones who should choose how to solve their conflict. The majority of citizens have the right to choose how to solve the issue. Even though it has been unsuccessful in the past, both groups believe a two-state solution is the best course of action. A Haaretz poll revealed that around 33% of Israelis are in favour of a two-state solution. By contrast, only 19% would support a one-state solution and 9% support a confederation.[1] Among Palestinians, support for a two-state solution sits at around 43%.[2] A two-state solution is the most popular among both groups, therefore it is the best solution to the conflict.

Counter arguments

A two-state solution has failed multiple times, including during the Oslo accords. Israelis and Palestinians simply cannot handle a two-state solution, and it always leads to violence in the end. Trying something over and over again that has been shown to fail multiple times is a waste of energy and lives. Even if public support is still in favor of a two-state solution, this doesn't necessarily mean it is the best solution. Average citizens may not be informed or knowledgeable on the subject, and just because the public wants it doesn't mean it's realistic. Even if the public hopes for it, that doesn't mean it will work. A realistic solution designed by diplomats and experienced policymakers, not random citizens, is much more effective.

Framing

Whatever solution the most people support is the best solution. Israeli and Palestinian citizens have the democratic right to choose the best solution to the conflict.

Premises

[P1] The citizens of the region have the right to choose solutions to their problems. [P2] A two-state solution is the most popular among Israelis and Palestinians. [P3] Therefore, a two-state solution should be adopted.

Rejecting the premises

[Rejecting P1] Just because a majority supports it, doesn't mean it is the best solution.

Proponents

Further Reading

References

  1. https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/israeli-palestinian-conflict-solutions/.premium-42-of-israelis-back-west-bank-annexation-including-two-state-supporters-1.7047313
  2. https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/israeli-palestinian-conflict-solutions/.premium-explained-two-states-one-and-other-solutions-to-the-israeli-palestinian-conflict-1.7044468

Explore related arguments

This page was last edited on Friday, 19 Jun 2020 at 21:40 UTC