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Is theocracy good? Show more Show less

Theocracy is a form of government in which God or a deity of some type is recognised as the supreme ruling authority, giving divine guidance to human intermediaries that manage the day to day affairs of the government who claim they are in power due to the divine will of their God or gods. Famous theocracies throughout history include the Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece and the Roman Empire where Emperors were often declared gods.

Yes, theocracies have many good points Show more Show less

Almost every major religion has a concept of a theocracy as part of its doctrine.
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A theocracy encourages stability

Theocracies could change the world for the better and increase societal stability.
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Context

The Argument

Outside of Europe, theocracies almost always tended to bring political stability. The Aztec civilisation, for example, was based upon theocracy and was able to sustain vast populations before the Spanish conquistadors destroyed it. Native American culture may have entailed a type of theocracy that enabled communities to live in harmony with their environment and not hunt animals to depletion.[1] The reason European Christian theocracies were unsuccessful was that Christianity contains no political instructions, so a western theocracy is tantamount to arbitrary rule.[1] Islam, unlike other religions aims to provide both a political framework and a spiritual solace for its adherents hence the persisting numbers of Muslim theocracies.[2]

Counter arguments

Framing

Premises

[P1] Historically, theocracies have caused politically harmonious societies.

Rejecting the premises

Proponents

Further Reading

References

  1. https://www.beliefnet.com/columnists/lordre/2015/10/theocracy-is-not-necessarily-bad.html
  2. https://www.jstor.org/stable/3992383?seq=1

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This page was last edited on Monday, 30 Mar 2020 at 09:56 UTC